picklesandwine:

staticwaltz:

Comedy Bang! Bang! - Vampire Chef Gets Pissed

Think before you speak. I get it. You and your writers came up with a bunch of dumb puns for this, but guess what? I’ve heard it all before!

(via laughterkey)

whathappened:

Radar has a superhero persona, created by my friend Brandi and me: the Scrambler: a well-intentioned hero of incredible strength who bursts on the scene to saves the day but makes a huge mess in the process.

“Help us, Scrambler!” the people cry, on the precipice of some terrible disaster.

“Scrambler, no!” they cry again, as he knocks them over the edge with his enthusiasm and good intentions.

- Elisabets: Choice Horses and Bad Dogs by Elisabeth Geier (aka whathappened)

My latest column is about how my bad dog keeps me alive.

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK
Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK

  1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
  2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
  3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
  4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
  5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
  6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

(via fuckyeahbookarts)

gabifresh:

The gabifresh x swimsuitsforall bikini has been restocked and is now available to buy here! For more photos from this shoot, check out gabifresh.com! If you reblog, please keep this caption <3

extra0rdinarilym3:

igooutwithabang:

when I commit to a person, I FUCKING COMMIT. if their depression, anxiety or life comes knocking, you bet your ass i’m at the door with a double sided axe waiting for a good fight. 

you cant expect people, to always be happy, even if they are in love. because life doesn’t stop for anyone. But you can be there for the good fight. 

my god why can’t everyone be like this

(via estoy-perdida)

spaceshipmatria:

stand-up-comic-gifs:

From Maria Bamford: The Special Special Special!

One of the best Maria bits ever.

(via dressesandyarn)