whiskeytimes:

The world’s largest scotch whisky collection in Edinburgh. Over 3,000 bottles! Would love to camp out there. All we need is a whisky glass and a sleeping bag.
whiskeytimes.com
Whiskey Times is dedicated to the passion, culture, and elegance of whiskey. Come see our reviews of whiskey, lounge furniture, books and more.
Connect with us.
Whiskey Times:  Whiskey Times  |  Facebook | Instagram  |  Tumblr

whiskeytimes:

The world’s largest scotch whisky collection in Edinburgh. Over 3,000 bottles! Would love to camp out there. All we need is a whisky glass and a sleeping bag.

whiskeytimes.com

Whiskey Times is dedicated to the passion, culture, and elegance of whiskey. Come see our reviews of whiskey, lounge furniture, books and more.

Connect with us.

Whiskey Times:  Whiskey Times  |  Facebook | Instagram  |  Tumblr

gentlewave:

Jean Béraud: Parisian Street Scene, ca. 1885, oil on panel, 38.7 x 26.8 cm, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, source: wikimedia.org.

gentlewave:

Jean Béraud: Parisian Street Scene, ca. 1885, oil on panel, 38.7 x 26.8 cm, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, source: wikimedia.org.

(via polyvinylfilms)

broken-synchronicity:

caskett-copop83:

This is like the cutest thing ever. It’s from the gif-set I reblogged.

Taking its first steps, and after successfully doing so, the chick goes “Yay!”

image

It’s so freaking cute.

(via books-and-lavender)

third-round-charm:

distraction:

Not many people know the stereotypical heart shape was meant to be two hearts fused together

Hey there. History nerd here… not many people know this “fact” because it’s not true. The universal heart shape we recognize today has nothing to do with the heart, actually. It has to do with early Roman birth control.The Romans used a plant called silphium to prevent pregnancy. It was so effective that it became a critical part of Rome’s economy and daily life. It was literally so important to their culture that the image of it’s seed were even imprinted on currency. It’s the exact shape of the heart we know today, and this is the first time it’s visage was ever recorded in history. It was so important to them, and so highly prized that they actually drove the plant into extinction by over harvesting it for use. This shape was so ingrained in their society’s conscious as a symbol of sexual liberation that it became associated with all aspects of intimacy, eg. sex, unity, and love.TL;DR: It’s not two hearts sewn together. It’s an ancient plant that Romans used to have gratuitous amounts of sex before condoms were around.

third-round-charm:

distraction:

Not many people know the stereotypical heart shape was meant to be two hearts fused together


Hey there. History nerd here… not many people know this “fact” because it’s not true. The universal heart shape we recognize today has nothing to do with the heart, actually. It has to do with early Roman birth control.

The Romans used a plant called silphium to prevent pregnancy. It was so effective that it became a critical part of Rome’s economy and daily life. It was literally so important to their culture that the image of it’s seed were even imprinted on currency.

It’s the exact shape of the heart we know today, and this is the first time it’s visage was ever recorded in history. It was so important to them, and so highly prized that they actually drove the plant into extinction by over harvesting it for use.

This shape was so ingrained in their society’s conscious as a symbol of sexual liberation that it became associated with all aspects of intimacy, eg. sex, unity, and love.

TL;DR:
It’s not two hearts sewn together. It’s an ancient plant that Romans used to have gratuitous amounts of sex before condoms were around.

(via sansasilvertongue)

cubbyzissou:

naamahdarling:

archiemcphee:

Spanish artist Raul del Sol may not be an entomologist by profession, but these finely-detailed ink on wood illustrations reveal that he certainly seems to be one at heart.

For a beautiful ongoing series entitled Metamorfosis, Raul closely studies insect anatomy and the stages of metamorphosis for different species and then illustrates their awesome transformation processes on sets of plain wooden Matryoshka or Russian nesting dolls.

Visit Raul del Sol’s website to view more of his elegant entomological artwork.

[via Illusion]

Beautiful work.

ALL THE GRABBY HANDS


Mindy Kaling in People Magazine’s 50 Most Beautiful People 2014 issue
Mindy Kaling in People Magazine’s 50 Most Beautiful People 2014 issue

(via irisalandra)

"I wish that I could, but I’m so close to finishing season one of ‘Damages’, and I made this, like, amazing cashew stir-fry for the week, so I’m actually pretty booked."

(via muffpunch)

When I look around, I see that everyone’s the protagonist of their own story. And the thing about stories is that not all of them have a happy ending. But some do.

(via zero-for-starters)

Society often blurs the lines between drag queens and trans women. This is highly problematic, because many people believe that, like drag queens, trans women go home, take off their wigs and chest plates, and walk around as men. Trans womanhood is not a performance or costume.

-Janet Mock, Redefining Realness (via inextinguishabledesires)

She puts into words the uneasiness I feel about drag culture and the popularity of RuPaul’s Drag Race and how it affects the way people see me.

(via bearhatalice)

(via bearhatalice)